INFOGRAPHIC: Cantilangnon, here are reminders on how to vote this coming Election 2013 | via @ABSCBNNews

INFOGRAPHIC: Cantilangnon, here are reminders on how to vote this coming Election 2013 | via @ABSCBNNews

10.05.13
Mano Taloy Trillanes - a man who will be forever remembered by many Cantilangnons for being there during their weddings, baptisms, funerals, birthdays and graduations although he may not have been a member of their family. “Pakodak ta kan Taloy” or “Lukata an imo kodak kan Taloy” are phrases most associated with the man who has become a part of Cantilan’s rich culture because of his photography. He captured moments in our lives before the age of digital airbrushing, where airbrushing to Mano Taloy means actually using a brush and paint to soften the edges of a picture that might have needed some “retoke”. Rest in Peace! ~ Allan H.

Mano Taloy Trillanes - a man who will be forever remembered by many Cantilangnons for being there during their weddings, baptisms, funerals, birthdays and graduations although he may not have been a member of their family. “Pakodak ta kan Taloy” or “Lukata an imo kodak kan Taloy” are phrases most associated with the man who has become a part of Cantilan’s rich culture because of his photography. He captured moments in our lives before the age of digital airbrushing, where airbrushing to Mano Taloy means actually using a brush and paint to soften the edges of a picture that might have needed some “retoke”. Rest in Peace! ~ Allan H.

19.01.12
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clipseiriberri:

GK Operation Walang Iwanan featured in ANC’s Dateline Philippines last Saturday, January 14. Thank you ANC and Ms. Lia Andanar Yu for having us!

Not yet excited about this January 25? You must definitely watch this to get you and your family and friends excited! 

WALANG IWANAN!

19.01.12
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Sa Ngalan Ng Mina???







15.10.11
Children’s Book on Mining and IP rights….

Children’s Book on Mining and IP rights….

14.10.11

DOJ: DENR has no right to grant mining permits

The Department of Justice said that the Department of Environment and Natural Resources secretary has no right to issue mining permits.According to Justice Secretary Leila de Lima, the Mines and Geosciences Bureau is the only agency that has the authority to grant special mining permits.De Lima said, “The intention of the law in granting the authority to the Director of the Bureau instead of the Secretary of DENR is clear, it is the Director of the Bureau who is in a better position to determine whether or not the requirements of the law have been complied with by the applicant. In this regard, a careful perusal of your letter does not show that the requirements were satisfied before the permit to Lupa Pigigetawan was issued.”This was in opposition to Environment Secretary Ramon Paje who upheld the Special Ore Extraction Permit awarded by former Secretary Lito Atienza Jr., to Lupa Pigigetawan mining firm in Zamboanga del Sur.When Paje took his office, he upheld the issuance of the permit even when the Bureau of Mines and Geosciences has expressed their opposition.Zamboanga Gov. Antonio Cerilles has also written to Paje to ask the secretary to withdraw the permit and implement the Cease and Desist order issued by the Bureau of Mines and Geosciences.De Lima said that the granting of mining permission can be given after verification and evaluation of the Mines and Geosciences Bureau.She added that it is basic in statutory interpretation that when the words and phrases of the statute are clear and unequivocal, the statute must be taken exactly what it says. The reason is because when the law is clear, interpretation does not apply. — ARA

DOJ: DENR has no right to grant mining permits

The Department of Justice said that the Department of Environment and Natural Resources secretary has no right to issue mining permits.
According to Justice Secretary Leila de Lima, the Mines and Geosciences Bureau is the only agency that has the authority to grant special mining permits.

De Lima said, “The intention of the law in granting the authority to the Director of the Bureau instead of the Secretary of DENR is clear, it is the Director of the Bureau who is in a better position to determine whether or not the requirements of the law have been complied with by the applicant. In this regard, a careful perusal of your letter does not show that the requirements were satisfied before the permit to Lupa Pigigetawan was issued.”

This was in opposition to Environment Secretary Ramon Paje who upheld the Special Ore Extraction Permit awarded by former Secretary Lito Atienza Jr., to Lupa Pigigetawan mining firm in Zamboanga del Sur.

When Paje took his office, he upheld the issuance of the permit even when the Bureau of Mines and Geosciences has expressed their opposition.

Zamboanga Gov. Antonio Cerilles has also written to Paje to ask the secretary to withdraw the permit and implement the Cease and Desist order issued by the Bureau of Mines and Geosciences.

De Lima said that the granting of mining permission can be given after verification and evaluation of the Mines and Geosciences Bureau.

She added that it is basic in statutory interpretation that when the words and phrases of the statute are clear and unequivocal, the statute must be taken exactly what it says. The reason is because when the law is clear, interpretation does not apply. — ARA

14.10.11
Romblon rejoices from withdrawal of mining firm
MANILA (Mindanao Examiner / Oct. 13, 2011) – Villagers from the island of Tablas in Romblon province praised the withdrawal of the proposed exploration activities of a Canadian mining firm, and locals vowed to protect their area from future mining exploration, according to the environmental group Alyansa Tigil Mina.It said the mining firm Ivanhoe Philippines, a subsidiary of Canada-based Ivanhoe Mines, cited low priority exploration target in withdrawing its applications with the Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB).Leo Deiparine, the firm’s president, in a letter sent to the MGB, said there was a consensus decision by the company to withdraw its applications based on Tablas as a low priority exploration target, and the strong opposition of local politicians for the approval of the applications, according to Alyansa Tigil Mina.Romblon Congressman Eleandro Jesus Madrona also welcomed Ivanhoe’s decision to cancel its planned exploration in the province. “It is indeed the unity and strong opposition of the people of Romblon against mining which resulted to the withdrawal of the application for exploration permit of Ivanhoe Philippines. This is a giant step towards a mining-free Romblon,” said Madrona, who recently filed House Bill 4815 (An Act Declaring the Province of Romblon a Mining Free Zone and Providing Penalties for Violations Thereof.)Romblon Governor Eduardo Firmalo also sided with the locals. “The power of the people and the political will of the leaders with the help of the civil society and religious sector clearly manifest the strong position of the province. We will continue to defend theright of our people to a balanced and healthy ecology,” he said.Firmalo earlier issued Executive Order No. 1 imposing an indefinite ban on metallic mining in the province.The Romblon Ecumenical Forum against Mining also called for the scrapping of the Mining Act of 1995 and the passage of a new mining law to rationalize the minerals industry, protect and promote human rights and establish so-called “no-go zones” based on alternative minerals management bills now in Congress.Its conveners, Catholic priest Nonato Ernie Fetalino and Philippine Independent Church Bishop Ronelio Fabriquer said in a joint statement: “This victory of the people is just the beginning; the challenge to protect our islands is a life-long commitment. We are in the middle of a spiritual battle against greed and corruption. We shall continue to defend the integrity of creation and human rights.”Jaybee Garganera, national coordinator of Alyansa Tigil Mina, said: “The genuinecommitment and struggle of the people led to the shortest advocacy campaign being supported by ATM, and one that went against a large Canadian company.”“If the province of Romblon can do it, the local government units and communities in other parts of the country resisting this destructive industry can now stand up more proudly to assert their power to decide.” (Mindanao Examiner)

Romblon rejoices from withdrawal of mining firm

MANILA (Mindanao Examiner / Oct. 13, 2011) – Villagers from the island of Tablas in Romblon province praised the withdrawal of the proposed exploration activities of a Canadian mining firm, and locals vowed to protect their area from future mining exploration, according to the environmental group Alyansa Tigil Mina.

It said the mining firm Ivanhoe Philippines, a subsidiary of Canada-based Ivanhoe Mines, cited low priority exploration target in withdrawing its applications with the Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB).

Leo Deiparine, the firm’s president, in a letter sent to the MGB, said there was a consensus decision by the company to withdraw its applications based on Tablas as a low priority exploration target, and the strong opposition of local politicians for the approval of the applications, according to Alyansa Tigil Mina.

Romblon Congressman Eleandro Jesus Madrona also welcomed Ivanhoe’s decision to cancel its planned exploration in the province. 

“It is indeed the unity and strong opposition of the people of Romblon against mining which resulted to the withdrawal of the application for exploration permit of Ivanhoe Philippines. This is a giant step towards a mining-free Romblon,” said Madrona, who recently filed House Bill 4815 (An Act Declaring the Province of Romblon a Mining Free Zone and Providing Penalties for Violations Thereof.)

Romblon Governor Eduardo Firmalo also sided with the locals. “The power of the people and the political will of the leaders with the help of the civil society and religious sector clearly manifest the strong position of the province. We will continue to defend the
right of our people to a balanced and healthy ecology,” he said.

Firmalo earlier issued Executive Order No. 1 imposing an indefinite ban on metallic mining in the province.

The Romblon Ecumenical Forum against Mining also called for the scrapping of the Mining Act of 1995 and the passage of a new mining law to rationalize the minerals industry, protect and promote human rights and establish so-called “no-go zones” based on alternative minerals management bills now in Congress.

Its conveners, Catholic priest Nonato Ernie Fetalino and Philippine Independent Church Bishop Ronelio Fabriquer said in a joint statement: “This victory of the people is just the beginning; the challenge to protect our islands is a life-long commitment. We are in the middle of a spiritual battle against greed and corruption. We shall continue to defend the integrity of creation and human rights.”

Jaybee Garganera, national coordinator of Alyansa Tigil Mina, said: “The genuine
commitment and struggle of the people led to the shortest advocacy campaign being supported by ATM, and one that went against a large Canadian company.”

“If the province of Romblon can do it, the local government units and communities in other parts of the country resisting this destructive industry can now stand up more proudly to assert their power to decide.” (Mindanao Examiner)

14.10.11

On Why Kinilaw is The Cantilangnon Food
by Bebong Arreza

If there’s one food that’s close to being endemic to Cantilan, then it would probably be the kinilaw. All those sarsiado putajes - those swimming in sauce that they make a glooping sound when you ladle them on to your plate - are either imports from China, or imitations of Spanish cooking . 

Kinilaw , on the other hand, is true-blue Cantilangnon cuisine , something which has been handed down through generations, that a kinilaw loving- gene has probably morphed in our DNA. It is a food that intertwines with our cultures, and captures who we are . If you want a gastronomic definition of what a Cantilangnon is , the kinilaw may come close it.

For example, if many are wondering why Cantilangnons are so passionate in their defense of the environment, they may find the answer in that dish.

You don’t burn fossil fuel or wood to prepare a fish kinilaw . Because it must be prepared fresh, then you need not refrigerate it . Hence, spared of the trip to the icebox, it will not consume a single watt of electricity . No other dish can boast of such green credential.

And because of this premium for freshness, then the fish to be “kilaw-ed” must be locally-sourced. Unlike Wagyu beef which must be flown halfway across the world, the kinilaw must jump from the fishpond to the plate, in minutes, not in weeks, in meters, not in miles.

It’s preparation likewise leaves a small carbon footprint . You don’t have to burn a forest of wood to cook it, the way lechons are roasted to cardiac perfection . Even the ingredients to accompany the raw fish are locally available . Basic kinilaw can be made out of two ‘S’ – suka and salt. Make it four ‘S’ – by adding ‘sibuyas and sili’ , then its perfect . Add balibajon and luj-a, then welcome to kinilaw Nirvana. 

You also need no fancy gadgets to prepare it. You just need two. Slice the fish with sundangay, mix the four ‘S’ in a plate, then it’s done. Leave the Oysterizers to the Bobby Flays of this world. In kinilaw, the recipe can be summed up in six words : Have knife and plate , will kilaw .

Kinilaw also captures the Cantilangnon traits of dili kun buraho and mahinatagon . In kinilaw , you only prepare what you can eat at the moment . It is not humba that can be hoarded . It is not adobo that can be reheated. It is not a glutton’s food because if you overeat kinilaw your stomach will punish you for your greed. 

Kinilaw is meant to shared and not be savored in solitude. The man who eats kinilaw alone is probably the loneliest in the world. Kinilaw is Cantilan’s original boodle fight food. It is a communal dish that you share with kith and kin. In fact, the joy in eating kinilaw is not in the tasting but in the sharing. 

Kinilaw is Cantilan’s party food. You serve it and the feast will automatically follow. It loosens wine bottles ,and tongues too , for serving it heralds drinking and bakak-bakak. It is bonding food that is the predicate for drinking , the premise for singing, and the preamble for drinking.

Because kinilaw must be sourced nearby, then it necessitates the imperative to protect its source . The right to enjoy kinilaw carries it with the duty to protect and preserve the seas which yield this bounty. Kinilaw and bad ecological practices don’t mix. You don’t poison the fishpond nor pollute the seas. What motivates the intrepid fishermen of Ayoke to protect their seas ? Kinilaw . Haven’t you noticed that they and the rest of Cantilangnons measure environmental degradation in kinilaw terms : “Waya nay bolinao na makilaw., Nihit na an angsuhan na puyde kilawon” 

The kinilaw allowed our ancestors to sail far and wide , nourishing them in their long journeys, as they traded with villages and , yes, occasionally raiding them too . It was the convenient food-on-the-go , needing no firewood to prepare and with the teeming source just under their boat’s hull. It was also probably the combat rations of the Bajujo-Calagdaan-Palasao bravehearts when they drove the Moros out of Tandag fort in the 1750s. It could be the reason that until today, “kinilaw “ is the ultimate trash talk to one’s opponent for no threat drips with much insult and sarcasm than “kilawon ko kaw !” 

I hope that like our forefathers, kinilaw remains our comfort food in the years ahead . 

Kilaw ta !

On Why Kinilaw is The Cantilangnon Food

by Bebong Arreza

If there’s one food that’s close to being endemic to Cantilan, then it would probably be the kinilaw. All those sarsiado putajes - those swimming in sauce that they make a glooping sound when you ladle them on to your plate - are either imports from China, or imitations of Spanish cooking . 

Kinilaw , on the other hand, is true-blue Cantilangnon cuisine , something which has been handed down through generations, that a kinilaw loving- gene has probably morphed in our DNA. It is a food that intertwines with our cultures, and captures who we are . If you want a gastronomic definition of what a Cantilangnon is , the kinilaw may come close it.

For example, if many are wondering why Cantilangnons are so passionate in their defense of the environment, they may find the answer in that dish.

You don’t burn fossil fuel or wood to prepare a fish kinilaw . Because it must be prepared fresh, then you need not refrigerate it . Hence, spared of the trip to the icebox, it will not consume a single watt of electricity . No other dish can boast of such green credential.

And because of this premium for freshness, then the fish to be “kilaw-ed” must be locally-sourced. Unlike Wagyu beef which must be flown halfway across the world, the kinilaw must jump from the fishpond to the plate, in minutes, not in weeks, in meters, not in miles.

It’s preparation likewise leaves a small carbon footprint . You don’t have to burn a forest of wood to cook it, the way lechons are roasted to cardiac perfection . Even the ingredients to accompany the raw fish are locally available . Basic kinilaw can be made out of two ‘S’ – suka and salt. Make it four ‘S’ – by adding ‘sibuyas and sili’ , then its perfect . Add balibajon and luj-a, then welcome to kinilaw Nirvana. 

You also need no fancy gadgets to prepare it. You just need two. Slice the fish with sundangay, mix the four ‘S’ in a plate, then it’s done. Leave the Oysterizers to the Bobby Flays of this world. In kinilaw, the recipe can be summed up in six words : Have knife and plate , will kilaw .

Kinilaw also captures the Cantilangnon traits of dili kun buraho and mahinatagon . In kinilaw , you only prepare what you can eat at the moment . It is not humba that can be hoarded . It is not adobo that can be reheated. It is not a glutton’s food because if you overeat kinilaw your stomach will punish you for your greed. 

Kinilaw is meant to shared and not be savored in solitude. The man who eats kinilaw alone is probably the loneliest in the world. Kinilaw is Cantilan’s original boodle fight food. It is a communal dish that you share with kith and kin. In fact, the joy in eating kinilaw is not in the tasting but in the sharing. 

Kinilaw is Cantilan’s party food. You serve it and the feast will automatically follow. It loosens wine bottles ,and tongues too , for serving it heralds drinking and bakak-bakak. It is bonding food that is the predicate for drinking , the premise for singing, and the preamble for drinking.

Because kinilaw must be sourced nearby, then it necessitates the imperative to protect its source . The right to enjoy kinilaw carries it with the duty to protect and preserve the seas which yield this bounty. Kinilaw and bad ecological practices don’t mix. You don’t poison the fishpond nor pollute the seas. What motivates the intrepid fishermen of Ayoke to protect their seas ? Kinilaw . Haven’t you noticed that they and the rest of Cantilangnons measure environmental degradation in kinilaw terms : “Waya nay bolinao na makilaw., Nihit na an angsuhan na puyde kilawon” 

The kinilaw allowed our ancestors to sail far and wide , nourishing them in their long journeys, as they traded with villages and , yes, occasionally raiding them too . It was the convenient food-on-the-go , needing no firewood to prepare and with the teeming source just under their boat’s hull. It was also probably the combat rations of the Bajujo-Calagdaan-Palasao bravehearts when they drove the Moros out of Tandag fort in the 1750s. It could be the reason that until today, “kinilaw “ is the ultimate trash talk to one’s opponent for no threat drips with much insult and sarcasm than “kilawon ko kaw !” 

I hope that like our forefathers, kinilaw remains our comfort food in the years ahead . 

Kilaw ta !

12.10.11

Kada Kantilangnon Solusyon (Every Cantilangnon is a Solution) is a movement spearheaded by YEGE Kantilangnon, a Balangay group of Pilipinas Natin campaign. This was born out of the enthusiasm of the campaign to empower not only the people of Cantilan in the province of Surigao del Sur in the Philippines but all the Filipinos to unite and put into action their desire to serve the country in whatever ways they can.

10.10.11
whatever you do to the world you do it to yourself

whatever you do to the world you do it to yourself

10.10.11